A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes

A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes

Witold Gombrowicz, Benjamin Ivry


Witold Gombrowicz (1904-1969), novelist, essayist, and playwright, was once essentially the most vital Polish writers of the 20th century. A candidate for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1968, he was once defined by means of Milan Kundera as “one of the good novelists of our century” and through John Updike as “one of the profoundest of the overdue moderns.”
Gombrowicz’s works have been thought of scandalous and subversive via the ruling powers in Poland and have been banned for almost 40 years. He spent his final years in France instructing philosophy; this booklet is a sequence of reflections in response to his lectures.
Gombrowicz discusses Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and Heidegger in six “one-hour” essays and addresses Marxism in a shorter “fifteen-minute” piece. The text—a small literary gem filled with sardonic wit, impressive insights, and provocative criticism—constructs the philosophical lineage of his work.

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