Adorno's Negative Dialectic: Philosophy and the Possibility of Critical Rationality (Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought)

Adorno's Negative Dialectic: Philosophy and the Possibility of Critical Rationality (Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought)

Brian O'Connor


The in simple terms philosophical matters of Theodor W. Adorno's damaging dialectic would appear to be a ways faraway from the concreteness of serious idea; Adorno's philosophy considers maybe the main conventional topic of "pure" philosophy, the constitution of expertise, while severe concept examines particular points of society. yet, as Brian O'Connor demonstrates during this hugely unique interpretation of Adorno's philosophy, the unfavorable dialectic may be obvious because the theoretical origin of the reflexivity or serious rationality required through serious conception. Adorno, O'Connor argues, is devoted to the "concretion" of philosophy: his thesis of nonidentity makes an attempt to teach that truth isn't really reducible to appearances. This lays the basis for the utilized "concrete" critique of appearances that's necessary to the potential for severe theory.To explicate the context during which Adorno's philosophy operates -- the culture of contemporary German philosophy, from Kant to Heidegger -- O'Connor examines intimately the information of those philosophers in addition to Adorno's self-defining variations with them. O'Connor discusses Georg Lucàcs and the impact of his "protocritical conception" on Adorno's suggestion; the weather of Kant's and Hegel's German idealism appropriated through Adorno for his idea of subject-object mediation; the concern of the article and the enterprise of the topic in Adorno's epistemology; and Adorno's very important reviews of Kant and the phenomenology of Heidegger and Husserl, evaluations that either remove darkness from Adorno's key ideas and display his building of serious conception via an engagement with the issues of philosophy.

Show sample text content

Download sample