Burn Down the Ground: A Memoir

Burn Down the Ground: A Memoir

Kambri Crews


In this strong, affecting, and unflinching memoir, a daughter appears again on her unconventional early life with deaf mom and dad in rural Texas whereas attempting to reconcile it to her current life—one within which her father is serving a twenty-year sentence in a maximum-security prison.
 
As a toddler, Kambri Crews wanted that she’d been born deaf in order that she, too, may possibly totally belong to the tight-knit Deaf neighborhood that embraced her mom and dad. Her appealing mom used to be a saint who might rapidly right anyone’s concept that deaf equaled dumb. Her good-looking father, nevertheless, used to be likely to be discovered striking out with the sinners. powerful, gregarious, and hardworking, he controlled to show a wild plot of land right into a kinfolk home entire with operating water and electrical energy. To Kambri, he was once Daniel Boone, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ben Franklin, and Elvis Presley all rolled into one.
 
But if Kambri’s dad was once Superman, then the listening to international used to be his kryptonite. The isolation that followed his deafness unlocked a fierce temper—a rage teenage Kambri witnessed while he attacked her mom, and that culminated fourteen years later in his conviction for an additional violent crime. 
 
With a wise mixture of brutal honesty and blunt humor, Kambri Crews explores her advanced bond along with her father—which starts with adoration, strikes to worry, and eventually arrives at understanding—as she attempts to forge a brand new connection among them whereas he lives in the back of bars. Burn Down the Ground is an excellent portrait of residing in worlds—one listening to, the opposite deaf; one less than the laid-back Texas solar, the opposite in the vigorous pulse of latest York urban; one mired in violence, the opposite rife with possibility—and heralds the arriving of a charming new voice.

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