Dancing in Your Head: Jazz, Blues, Rock, and Beyond

Dancing in Your Head: Jazz, Blues, Rock, and Beyond

Gene Santoro


As song columnist for The Nation, Gene Santoro has verified himself as a major new serious voice, capable of write good on a wide spectrum of well known tune and jazz with no wasting contact with the innovative of modern-day song scene. approximately Nat "King" Cole, Santoro reviews: "adjectives cannot describe the swinging, ingratiating self-confidence laced with tenderness that colours Nat "King" Cole's making a song. His baritone/tenor is so ethereal and elemental, so palpably actual, it invitations you in, then surrounds you glowingly..." And at the hugely winning rock band residing color, Santoro is not any much less evocative: "hardcore steel raveups slam into bluesy ballads and psychedelicized pop, lilting Caribbean inflections collide with hiphop scrambles of prerecorded fabric and touches of funk."
Dancing on your Head gathers Santoro's liveliest studies and essays for the 1st time, introducing a clean and provocative viewpoint on a number of many years of musicians and their paintings. Santoro covers a large musical vista, from the mythical blues singer Robert Johnson to Public Enemy's arguable rap lyrics, from the lengthy operating conflict among blues and African American gospel to the rock iconoclast Neil younger, from the good James Brown to George Hay, the founding father of the Grand Ole Opry. Documenting the evolution of jazz, rock and roll, and rap, Santoro's observations are incisive, sincere, and reflective. Of his early publicity to Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane and Bela Bartok, Santoro feedback, "That experience of ask yourself and discovery is what occurs while you have been hit through art's quick vatic energy. It hasn't ever left me, has been touched and renewed by way of each one come across i have valued." Santoro examines the endurance of track legends Lou Reed, Eric Clapton, the thankful useless, and sunlight Ra, the freewheeling jazz artist who prefers to name himself a tone artist instead of a musician. distinctive highlights comprise a number of items on Miles Davis; booklet experiences, together with one on Gunther Schuller's two-volume History of Jazz; a full of life and targeted profile of the Neville Brothers; and a dialogue of jazz nice Ornette Coleman that compares him to Orson Welles and Charles Ives.
Taken jointly the items in Dancing on your Head study the historic roots of brand new renowned track whereas delivering perception into performers and developments that dominate the present scene. Balancing a serious and historic sensibility with an unharnessed enthusiasm for all varieties of track, Santoro is a perfect consultant to the previous and new.

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