Dubious Facts: The Evidence of Early Chinese Historiography (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture)

Dubious Facts: The Evidence of Early Chinese Historiography (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture)

Garret P. S. Olberding


An leading edge method to old documents assesses how facts claims and coverage arguments have been placed forth within the royal courts of early China.

What have been the intentions of early China’s historians? smooth readers needs to deal with the stress among the narrators’ moralizing remark and their description of occasions. even though those historians had notions of facts, it's not transparent to what quantity they valued what modern students may deem “hard” evidence. supplying an leading edge method of premodern old records, Garret P. S. Olberding argues that the speeches of courtroom advisors display sophisticated ideas of data administration within the early monarchic context. Olberding makes a speciality of these addresses pertaining to army campaigns the place facts will be very important in guiding quick social and political coverage. His research finds the subtle conventions that ruled the imperial advisor’s good judgment and suasion in serious country discussions, which have been particularly meant to counter expected doubts. Dubious evidence illuminates either the decision-making tactics that trained early chinese language army campaigns and the historic documents that characterize them.

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