Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic

Improvising Medicine: An African Oncology Ward in an Emerging Cancer Epidemic

Julie Livingston


In Improvising Medicine, Julie Livingston tells the tale of Botswana's in basic terms committed melanoma ward, situated in its capital urban of Gaborone. This affecting ethnography follows sufferers, their kin, and ward employees as a melanoma epidemic emerged in Botswana. The epidemic is a part of an ongoing surge in cancers around the international south; the tales of Botswana's oncology ward dramatize the human stakes and highbrow and institutional demanding situations of an outbreak that may form the way forward for worldwide wellbeing and fitness. they communicate the contingencies of high-tech medication in a medical institution the place important machines are frequently damaged, medicines pass out and in of inventory, and bed-space is often at a top rate. additionally they exhibit melanoma as whatever that occurs between humans. critical disorder, care, discomfort, disfigurement, or even dying come to be deeply social studies. Livingston describes the melanoma ward by way of the forms, vulnerability, strength, biomedical technological know-how, mortality, and wish that form modern adventure in southern Africa. Her ethnography is a profound mirrored image at the social orchestration of desire and futility in an African clinic, the politics and economics of healthcare in Africa, and palliation and disfigurement around the international south.

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