Intimate Strangers: Arendt, Marcuse, Solzhenitsyn, and Said in American Political Discourse

Intimate Strangers: Arendt, Marcuse, Solzhenitsyn, and Said in American Political Discourse

Andreea Deciu Ritivoi


Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and Edward stated every one suggested significant highbrow and political colleges of notion in American political discourse after international warfare II, but none of them used to be American, which proved the most important to their methods of arguing and reasoning either out and in of the yank context. with a view to persuade their audiences they have been American sufficient, those thinkers deployed deft rhetorical ideas that made their cosmopolitanism think appropriate, inspiring radical new ways to longstanding difficulties in American politics. conversing like natives, additionally they exploited their foreignness to appeal to listeners to embody substitute modes of idea.

Intimate Strangers unpacks this "stranger ethos," a mix of detachment and involvement that manifested within the personality of a prophet for Solzhenitsyn, an neutral observer for Arendt, a mentor for Marcuse, and a sufferer for stated. but regardless of its many successes, the stranger ethos did alienate many audiences, and critics proceed to push aside those thinkers now not for his or her positions yet due to their overseas viewpoint. This booklet encourages readers to reject this type of serious xenophobia, throwing aid at the back of a political discourse that debts for the beliefs of voters and noncitizens alike.

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