Neither God nor Master: Robert Bresson and Radical Politics

Neither God nor Master: Robert Bresson and Radical Politics

Brian Price


The French auteur Robert Bresson, director of such classics as Diary of a rustic Priest (1951), The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), The satan, Probably (1977), and L’Argent (1983), has lengthy been considered a transcendental filmmaker preoccupied with questions of grace and predestination and little attracted to the issues of the social global. This booklet is the 1st to view Bresson’s paintings in an altogether diversified context. instead of a religious—or spiritual—filmmaker, Bresson is published as an artist steeped in radical, innovative politics.
Situating Bresson in radical and aesthetic political contexts, from surrealism to situationism, Neither God nor Master indicates how his early type was once a version for social resistance. We then see how, after may well 1968, his motion pictures have been in truth a sequence of reflections at the failure of revolution in France—especially as “failure” is known relating to Bresson’s selected literary precursors, Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy, and Russian innovative tradition of the 19th century.
Restoring Bresson to the novel political tradition from which he emerged—and to which he remained faithful—Price bargains a tremendous revision of the recognition of 1 of the main celebrated figures within the historical past of French movie. In doing so, he increases better philosophical questions about the efficacy of progressive practices and questions about interpretation and metaphysical trends of movie old study that experience, in the past, long past principally untested.

Show sample text content

Download sample