On the Waterfront (BFI Film Classics)

On the Waterfront (BFI Film Classics)

Leo Braudy


"I might have been a contender, i may were somebody." So speaks the haunted former boxer Terry Malloy (Marlon Brando) to his brother Charley (Rod Steiger) in a scene from On the Waterfront (Elia Kazan, 1954) that's the most well-known in all cinema. Set between unionised big apple longshoremen, Kazan's movie (from a screenplay by means of Budd Schulberg) recounts Terry's fight opposed to corruption and his final, hard-won victory. The marvellous performances of Brando, Steiger and Eva Marie Saint (as good as Karl Malden and Lee J. Cobb), Boris Kaufman's images and Leonard Bernstein's rating all justify the film's status. yet at the Waterfront is additionally infamous, looked by means of many as an try at justifying the choice at the a part of Kazan (and Schulberg) to call names prior to the home UnAmerican actions Committee. That debatable selection remains to be incendiary at the present time (as was once evidenced within the furore that surrounded Kazan's Academy Award for Lifetime success in 1999). With Kazan's dying in 2003 and Brando's in 2004, a reappraisalof at the Waterfront is well timed and useful. during this definitive examine, Leo Braudy tells the complex tale of the film's creation. He revisits the proof in the back of the talk of Kazan's testimony yet, specially, he analyses the weather which give a contribution to the long-lasting charm of On the Waterfront: the Method-inspired performing, the song and cinematography, using real destinations and its powerfully symbolic depiction of post-war American values.

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