Reading Pakeha?: Fiction and Identity in Aotearoa New Zealand. (Cross/Cultures)

Reading Pakeha?: Fiction and Identity in Aotearoa New Zealand. (Cross/Cultures)

Christina Stachurski


Aotearoa New Zealand, "a tiny Pacific country," is of serious curiosity to these engaged in postcolonial and literary reports during the global. In all former colonies, myths of nationwide identification are vested with quite a few pursuits. Shifts in collective Pakeha (or New Zealand-European) id were marked through the exceptional approval for 3 novels, every one at a time of big social switch. Late-colonialism, anti-imperialism, and the cave in of the belief of a novel 'nation' will be traced during the reception of John Mulgan's Man on my own (1939), Keri Hulme's the bone humans (1983), and Alan Duff's Once have been Warriors (1990). but shut research of those 3 novels additionally unearths marginalization and silencing in claims to singular Pakeha id and a linear improvement of settler acculturation. this kind of dynamic resonates with that of alternative 'settler' cultures - the similarities and ameliorations telling compared. in particular, Reading Pakeha? Fiction and identification in Aotearoa New Zealand explores how options of race and ethnicity intersect with these of gender, intercourse, and sexuality. This publication additionally asks even if 'Pakeha' remains to be a significant time period.

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