Reinventing Citizenship: Black Los Angeles, Korean Kawasaki, and Community Participation (Critical American Studies)

Reinventing Citizenship: Black Los Angeles, Korean Kawasaki, and Community Participation (Critical American Studies)

Kazuyo Tsuchiya


In the Sixties and Seventies, the USA and Japan went via great welfare expansions that sparked debates approximately citizenship. on the center of those disputes stood African americans and Koreans. Reinventing Citizenship bargains a comparative examine of African American welfare activism in l. a. and Koreans’ campaigns for welfare rights in Kawasaki. In working-class and negative neighborhoods in either destinations, African american citizens and Koreans sought not just to be well-known as electorate but additionally to turn into valid constituting contributors of communities.

Local activists in l. a. and Kawasaki ardently challenged the welfare associations. by way of developing competition activities and voicing substitute visions of citizenship, African American leaders, Tsuchiya argues, became Lyndon B. Johnson’s warfare on Poverty right into a conflict for equality. Koreans countered the city’s and the nation’s exclusionary regulations and asserted their welfare rights. Tsuchiya’s paintings exemplifies transnational antiracist networking, displaying how black spiritual leaders traveled to Japan to satisfy Christian Korean activists and to supply advice for his or her personal struggles.

Reinventing Citizenship reveals how race and citizenship remodel as they go international locations and continents. by way of documenting the interconnected histories of African americans and Koreans in Japan, Tsuchiya permits us to reconsider current rules of group and belonging.

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