Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900-1942

Slow Fade to Black: The Negro in American Film, 1900-1942

Thomas Cripps


Set opposed to the backdrop of the black fight in society, Slow Fade to Black is the definitive heritage of African-American accomplishment in film--both ahead of and at the back of the camera--from the earliest video clips via international warfare II. As he documents the altering attitudes towards African-Americans either in Hollywood and the kingdom at huge, Cripps explores the expansion of discrimination as filmmakers turned an increasing number of intrigued with myths of the previous South: the "lost cause" point of the Civil battle, the stately mansions and gracious girls of the antebellum South, the "happy" slaves making a song within the fields. Cripps exhibits how those characterizations culminated within the blatantly racist attitudes of Griffith's The delivery of a Nation, and the way this movie encouraged the N.A.A.C.P. to crusade vigorously--and successfully--for swap. whereas the interval of the Twenties to Nineteen Forties used to be one replete with Hollywood stereotypes (blacks usually seemed as domestics or "natives," or have been portrayed in shiftless, cowardly "Stepin Fetchit" roles), there has been additionally an try out at self sustaining black production--on the complete unsuccessful. yet with the arriving of worldwide struggle II, expanding pressures for a much wider use of blacks in movies, and demands extra equitable therapy, African-Americans did start to obtain extra sympathetic roles, equivalent to that of Sam, the piano participant within the 1942 vintage Casablanca.
a full of life, thorough background of African-Americans within the video clips, Slow Fade to Black is usually a perceptive social remark on evolving racial attitudes during this nation throughout the first 4 many years of the 20 th century.

Show sample text content

Download sample