The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels: An Entangled Bank

The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels: An Entangled Bank

John Glendening


ruled via Darwinism and the various guises it assumed, evolutionary concept used to be a resource of possibilities and problems for overdue Victorian novelists. Texts produced through Wells, Hardy, Stoker, and Conrad are exemplary in reflecting and taking part in those demanding situations. not just do they cope with evolutionary problems, John Glendening argues, however the complexities and entanglements of evolutionary thought, interacting with a number of cultural impacts, completely permeate the narrative, descriptive, and thematic cloth of every. the entire books Glendening examines, from The Island of surgeon Moreau and Dracula to middle of Darkness, deal with the interrelationship among order and chaos published and promoted by means of evolutionary taking into account the interval. Glendening's specific concentration is on how Darwinism informs novels when it comes to a past due Victorian tradition that inspired authors to emphasize, no longer goal truths illuminated via Darwinism, yet relatively the contingencies, uncertainties, and confusions generated through it and other kinds of evolutionary thought.

Show sample text content

Download sample