The Female Thermometer: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Invention of the Uncanny (Ideologies of Desire)

The Female Thermometer: Eighteenth-Century Culture and the Invention of the Uncanny (Ideologies of Desire)

Terry Castle


The paintings of best pupil Terry citadel, known as via the New York Times "always engaging...consistently fascinating," has helped to revolutionize eighteenth-century reports. The woman Thermometer brings jointly Castle's essays at the phantasmagoric facet of eighteenth-century literature and tradition. Taking as her brand the fanciful "female thermometer," an imaginary device invented by way of eighteenth-century satirists to degree degrees of girl sexual arousal, fortress explores what she calls the "impinging strangeness" of the eighteenth-century imagination--the ways that the rationalist imperatives of the age mockingly labored to provide what Freud may later name the uncanny. In essays on doubling and myth within the novels of Defoe and Richardson, sexual impersonators and the dream-like international of the eighteenth-century masquerade, magic-lantern indicates, automata, and different surreal innovations of Enlightenment technological know-how, and the hallucinatory obsessions of Gothic fiction, fortress bargains a haunting portrait of a amazing epoch. Her assortment explores the hyperlinks among fabric tradition, gender, and the increase of recent types and formulation of subjectivity, successfully rewriting the cultural historical past of contemporary Europe from a materialist and feminist perspective.

Show sample text content

Download sample