The Inward Urge: 1960s Science Fiction and Imperialism

The Inward Urge: 1960s Science Fiction and Imperialism

David M. Higgins


technological know-how fiction’s “inward” flip within the Sixties coincides with an introspective shift in
British and American imperial imaginings. In a second whilst the best of the “frontier”
is reworking in the USA, and at a time while decolonization is reversing the ecu
colonial undertaking, technological know-how fiction turns its awareness to “inner” instead of “outer” areas,
and this introspective flip indexes the altering contours of imperial discourse and
practice within the Sixties. The technological know-how fiction of this era rejects the ontological
imperialism of modernist meta-narratives by means of exploring legitimate plural subjectivities; on the
same time, it indexes the ways that imperial strength can make the most of postmodern strategies to
retain asymmetrical privilege. This dissertation indexes chilly battle modifications in
imperial imaginings within the fiction of Robert A. Heinlein, Frank Herbert, Arthur C. Clarke,
J. G. Ballard, Michael Moorcock, Brian Aldiss, Thomas Disch, Philip okay. Dick, Philip
Jose Farmer, Joanna Russ, Samuel Delany, and Ursula okay. Le Guin. those texts supply
revealing insights into the ongoing energy of contemporary imperial concepts and into
emergent formations of postmodern neo-imperialism.

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