The Language of War: Literature and Culture in the U.S. from the Civil War through World War II

The Language of War: Literature and Culture in the U.S. from the Civil War through World War II

James Dawes


The Language of War examines the connection among language and violence, concentrating on American literature from the Civil struggle, global conflict I, and global struggle II. James Dawes proceeds by way of constructing basic questions: How does the strategic violence of warfare have an effect on literary, criminal, and philosophical representations? And, in flip, how do such representations have an effect on the reception and initiation of violence itself? Authors and texts of relevant significance during this far-reaching learn variety from Louisa may well Alcott and William James to William Faulkner, the Geneva Conventions, and modern American organizational sociology and language theory.

The consensus strategy in literary reports over the last 20 years has been to regard language as an extension of violence. the concept that there can be an inverse relation among language and violence, says Dawes, has all too hardly prompted the dominant voices in literary reviews this present day. this can be an bold venture that not just makes a major contribution to American literary historical past, but in addition demanding situations many of the prime theoretical assumptions of our day.

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