The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America

The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America

Jay Sexton


President James Monroe’s 1823 message to Congress mentioning competition to ecu colonization within the Western Hemisphere turned the cornerstone of nineteenth-century American statecraft. The Monroe Doctrine proclaimed anticolonial rules, but it speedily turned the parable and capacity for next generations of politicians to pursue expansionist international rules. The the most important episodes in 19th and early-twentieth-century overseas relations—westward growth within the 1840s, Civil warfare international relations, the imperialism of 1898, front into international conflict I, and the institution of the League of Nations—were framed through the Doctrine as its that means developed to fit the goals and fears of an American empire. In Jay Sexton’s adroit telling, the Monroe Doctrine offers a brand new lens wherein to view an excellent paradox on the middle of yankee background: the nation’s conflicting traditions of anticolonialism and imperialism.

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