The Satires of Horace and Persius

The Satires of Horace and Persius

Horace, Aulus Persius Flaccus


Inspiring poets from Ben Jonson and Alexander Pope to W. H. Auden and Robert Frost, the writings of Horace and Persius have had a robust impact on later Western literature. The Satires of Persius are hugely idiosyncratic, containing a brave assault at the poetry and morals of his filthy rich contemporaries—even the ruling emperor, Nero. The Satires of Horace, written within the stricken decade finishing with the institution of Augustus's regime, offer an a laugh remedy of men's perennial enslavement to cash, energy, glory, and intercourse. Epistles I, addressed to the poet's neighbors, bargains with the matter of attaining contentment amid the complexities of city lifestyles, whereas Epistles II and the Ars Poetica talk about Latin poetry—its background and social services, and the craft required for its good fortune.

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