The Sugar Barons: Family, Corruption, Empire, and War in the West Indies

The Sugar Barons: Family, Corruption, Empire, and War in the West Indies

Matthew Parker


To those that shuttle there this day, the West Indies are unspoiled paradise islands. but that photograph conceals a turbulent and stunning heritage. For a few 200 years after 1650, the West Indies have been the strategic heart of the Western world's maximum energy struggles as Europeans made and misplaced titanic fortunes transforming into and buying and selling in sugar-a commodity so profitable it grew to become referred to as "white gold." Matthew Parker vividly chronicles how the wealth of her island colonies grew to become the basis and concentration of England's advertisement and imperial greatness, underpinning the British economic climate and eventually fueling the economic Revolution. but with the very good wealth got here untold distress: the horror persisted through slaves, on whose backs the sugar empire used to be brutally outfitted; the rampant ailment that claimed the lives of one-third of all whites inside 3 years of arrival within the Caribbean; the cruelty, corruption, and decadence of the plantation tradition. large in scope, wealthy intimately, The Sugar Barons freshly hyperlinks the histories of Europe, the West Indies, and North the United States and divulges the complete effect of the sugar revolution, the resonance of that is nonetheless felt today.

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