Tintin and the Secret of Literature

Tintin and the Secret of Literature


Arguing that the Tintin books' characters are as robust and their plots as advanced as any dreamed up by means of the good novelists, Tom McCarthy asks an easy query: Is Tintin literature? Taking a cue from Tintin himself — who spends a lot of his time monitoring down illicit radio indications, getting into crypts, and interpreting puzzles — McCarthy means that we too have to “tune in” and decode if we wish to catch what is going on in Hergé's terribly well known paintings. What emerges from McCarthy's exam of Tintin is a amazing tale of illegitimacy and deceit, in either Hergé's paintings and his circle of relatives heritage. McCarthy's irresistibly shrewdpermanent, tightly built booklet exhibits how the topics Tintin generates — expulsion from domestic, violation of the sacred, the host-guest courting became bitter, and anxieties round questions of forgery and fakes — are an analogous that experience fueled and stricken writers from the classical period to the current day.

Show sample text content

Download sample