Unlearning with Hannah Arendt

Unlearning with Hannah Arendt

Marie Luise Knott


Short-listed for the Tractatus Essay Prize, an exam of the cutting edge options Arendt used to accomplish highbrow freedom
 
After staring at the trial of Adolf Eichmann, Hannah Arendt articulated her debatable inspiration of the “banality of evil,” thereby posing some of the most chilling and divisive ethical questions of the 20 th century: How can genocidal acts be conducted via non-psychopathic humans? by way of revealing the whole complexity of the trial with reasoning that confounded triumphing attitudes, Arendt grew to become the item of critical and infrequently slanderous feedback, wasting a few of her closest neighbors in addition to being categorized a “self-hating Jew.”  And whereas her theories have endured to attract innumerable rivals, Arendt’s paintings continues to be a useful source for these looking higher perception into the extra problematical elements of human nature.
 
Anchoring its dialogue within the subject matters of translation, forgiveness, dramatization, or even laughter, Unlearning with Hannah Arendt explores the ways that this iconic political theorist “unlearned” well-known tendencies and patterns—both philosophical and cultural—to determine a theoretical praxis all her personal. via an research of the social context and highbrow influences—Karl Jaspers, Walter Benjamin, and Martin Heidegger—that assisted in shaping Arendt’s approach, Knott has shaped a traditionally engaged and incisive contribution to Arendt’s legacy.

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