Your Band Sucks: What I Saw at Indie Rock's Failed Revolution (But Can No Longer Hear)

Your Band Sucks: What I Saw at Indie Rock's Failed Revolution (But Can No Longer Hear)


A memoir charting thirty years of the yankee indie rock underground by way of a musician who used to be at its center
 
Jon high quality spent approximately thirty years appearing and recording with bands that performed competitive and difficult underground rock track, and, as he writes, at no element have been any of these bands “ever threatened, even distantly, via real fame.” but while the contributors of his Eighties post-hardcore band whinge Magnet got here jointly for an not going reunion journey in 2011, diehard enthusiasts traveled from everywhere to wait their indicates, regardless of creeping middle-age tasks of parenthood and 9-to-5 jobs.
 
Their devotion was once testomony to the awesome endurance of indie tradition. In indie rock’s pre-Internet glory days, bands like complain Magnet, Black Flag, undertaking of Burma, and Sonic Youth—operating a ways outdoor advertisement radio and significant label promotion—attracted enthusiasts via note of mouth, university DJs, checklist shops, and zines. they discovered glory in all-night recording periods, shoestring van excursions, and unending appearances in dirty golf equipment. a few bands with a foot during this scene, like REM and Nirvana, ultimately attained mainstream good fortune. Many others, like whinge Magnet, have been liked purely by means of the main obsessed fanatics of the time.
 
Your Band Sucks is an insider’s examine that interesting, outrageous culture—how it emerged and advanced, the way it grappled with the mainstream and vice versa, and its unusual rebirth in recent times as numerous bands reunited, in brief and bittersweetly. With behind the scenes entry to many key characters at the scene—and lots of wit and sharply worded opinion—Fine provides a memoir that affectionately but significantly portrays a huge, heady second in track history.

Praise for Your Band Sucks:
“Everything a cult-fave musician’s memoir could be: It’s a seductively readable publication that calls for no prior wisdom of the writer, complain Magnet or the other band with which he’s played.” —Janet Maslin, The manhattan Times
 
“Jon high-quality has produced as evocative a portrait of the underground tune scene as any wistful, graying post-punk might want for.” —The Atlantic

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